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Volunteer Essentials

by cpagano
(reading level: 13)
(read time: over 30 min.)
(views: 692)
(age rating: for all audiences)

Author's Note: Be sure to use the powerful resources as references to continuing staying educated on volunteer best practices.

Main ideas: helping, community

Summary: A training power point presentation working through the essentials that all volunteers and organizations need to be successful.

GLEN STUBBOLO 

UD NPMCC

MAY 7, 2015

Volunteer Essentials

1

 

Introduction

Glen Stubbolo

Chief of Volunteer & Community Involvement

14 Non-profit Friends Groups

5000 + volunteers

108,000 volunteer hours

Former Vice Chair Delaware Commission on National and Volunteer Service

 

Your Name/ Role/ Favorite Volunteer Experience/Story

1, Divide into Small Groups

Small group introductions

Vote by Standing:

How many engage Volunteers

How Many directly supervise/ interact with volunteers

How many think Volunteers are under-utilized in your agency or could have a larger role

How many actually did the advance work sheets

 

Acid Pit Game; 4-5 Volunteers to Play :Acid Pit Game”

Draw conclusion:

Nervous when tasked without instructions

End person- simple, many ways to accomplish

Fun

People Different

Understand capabilities= opens new opportunities

Don’t have to create everything new

SYSTEM and PROCESS that help increase lieklihood of Success

 

 

2

 

Strategic Volunteer engagement; A Guide for Nonprofits and Public Sector Leaders, Sarah Jane Rehnborg,PhD., Wanda Lee Bailey, MSW, and Christina Sinatra, M.Paff, RGK Center for Philanthropy & Community Service, The LBJ School of Public Affairs, The University of Texas at Austin, May 2009

Volunteer Management: Mobilizing All the Resources of the Community, 

2nd Edition

Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch

3

 

New Breed: Understanding and Equipping the 21st Century Volunteer, Jonathan McKee and Thomas W. McKee, Group Publishing 2008

Boomer Volunteer Engagement: Collaborate Today, Thrive Tomorrow, Jill Friedman Fixler & Sandie Eichberg, with Gail Lorenz, CVA, Authorhouse Publishing, 2008

4

 

Sources

Volunteer Growth in America, a Review of Trends Since 1974, CNCS

Increasing Retention Along the Volunteer Life Cycle, Rick Lynch

One of a Kind? Comparing Episodic and Regular Volunteers at the Philadelphia Ronald McDonald House, The International Journal of Volunteer Administration, Volume XXV, Number 3

Keeping Volunteers, A Guide to Retention, Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch

Building Better Skills, Betty Stallings, 1996

Changing the Paradigm, Point of Light Foundation, The Eleven Characteristics of High Effectiveness

Best Practices for Volunteer Programs, Sue Vineyard and Steve McCurley

Managing Volunteers, A Report from the United Parcel Service, 1998

5

 

Resources

Focus on Volunteerism KopyKit, Susan Ellis, Energize Inc.

 

Managing Volunteers, Volunteer Ireland, www.volunteeringireland.ie

 

http://positivelymagazine.com/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interpersonal_relationship

 

Levinger, G. (1983). Development and change. In H.H. Kelley, et al. (Eds.), Close Relationships. (pp. 315–359). New York: W.H. Freeman and Company.

 

Trends in Volunteer Management, Scott Martin, Center for Intergenerational Learning, Temple University.

 

Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities and Congregations, a Briefing Report, Urban Institute, 200410 Steps of Screening

Ten Steps of Screening, Volunteer Canada 

http://volunteer.ca/content/2012-screening-handbook

 

Donor Engagement Study: Aligning Nonprofit Strategy with Donor Preferences, Rich Dietz and Ted Druart, Abila Edge Research, February 2015

 

 

 

 

 

 

6

 

Resources

Volunteer Administration Professional Practice, editor Keith Seel, Chapter 7: Sustaining Volunteer Involvement, Mark A Hager, PhD and Jeffrey L. Brudney, PhD.

Volunteer Growth in America, a Review of Trends Since 1974, CNCS

Keeping Volunteers, A Guide to retention, Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch

Volunteer Management: Mobilizing All the Resources of the Community, 2nd Edition         Steve McCurley and Rick Lynch

7

 

History of Volunteering Volunteering: History of an American Value by Stephanie Rosenburg, April 18, 2013 VolunteerMatch

Beginning Colonist Band together to survive

8

 

Benjamin Franklin- 1736

First volunteer Fire Company

 

 

patrickmurfin.blogspot.com

 

                                                     Boycotts and Militia                      

                                                      during the Revolution

 

 

 

 

 

"The Whites of Their Eyes" Colonial militia at Bunker Hill 1775. Ken Riley.

9

 

Great Awakening- service come to forefront:

YMCA, Red Cross, United Way

Mentalfloss.com

en.wikipedia.org

10

 

Civil War- Ladies Aid Societies- providing care, aid, support

Connecticutthistory.org

Somdcwrt.org

11

 

20th Century- Volunteering goes Mainstream

Rotary, Kiwanis, Lions Clubs

Dailykos.com

12

 

Coordinated Volunteer Efforts- Great Depression

Volunteers of America

Soup Lines and the CCC

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

First Volunteer Bureau- Minneapolis 1919

13

 

World War II- volunteers military and at home

Supplies, entertainment, caring

14

 

After the war- War on Poverty creation of the Peace Corps

15

 

Today- America pastime

1 in 4 volunteer

 

1990: Points of Light Foundation

 

1994: AmeriCorps and the CNCS

SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION- What Conclusions regarding development of volunteerism do do draw from this? What applications do you see today?

16

 

WHAT CONCLUSIONS REGARDING DEVELOPMENT OF VOLUNTEERISM DO YOU DRAW FROM THIS? 

 

2. WHAT APPLICATIONS DO YOU SEE TODAY?

Group Discussion

17

 

Is this a Volunteer?

Small Group Discuss assigned scenario

 

Right Column: Reasons it is a volunteer

 

Left Column: Reason Against it being a Volunteer

 

 

 

 

 

 

Gather into large discussion- Key Elements

 

2. How do we Define a Volunteer- rather like Acid Pit first Person

 

3. Create Definition 

18

 

Define: Volunteer

"Volunteer" is any trustee, ex officio trustee, director, officer, agent or worker who is engaged in an activity without compensation.

-DE Code Title 10 Section 8133

Does having these definition change your answer to Is This a Volunteer?

CONSIDER: What About- Corporate Worker – Court Ordered- Welfare to Work – Client for Service

 

In what ways to Volunteers Differ from Staff?

Are All Volunteers the same?

 

 

 

 

 

19

 

ACTIVITY

Needs Assessment

Select a volunteer position you want to develop:

Current- develop more fully

New to meet unmet need

War out of the box- exploring new territory

Description of What they will do:  Use the Form to gather all of your thoughts on what would go into creating a position.

Use Jill’s Volunteer Position Description Form

 

DISCUSSION:

 

What are the key considerations

 

Needs of Agency

Volunteer and Client

20

 

Focus of Project

     Organization

Volunteer

Client

Organization- did you find your self limited in what is allowed? Is done?  Does your organization limit scope?

 

Volunteers- did you find yourself limiting to s sterotype?

21

 

Agenda

Module I: Organization

LUNCH

 

Module 2:  Volunteers Types, Myths and Motivation

 

Module 3:Models of engagement

BREAK

 

Module 4: Other Considerations

Risk Management & Liability

Fundraising Volunteers

 

CONCLUSION

 

4-5 Volunteers to Play :Acid Pit Game”

Draw conclusion:

Nervous when tasked without instructions

End person- simple, many ways to accomplish

Fun

People Different

Understand capabilities= opens new opportunities

Don’t have to create everything new

SYSTEM and PROCESS that help increase lieklihood of Success

22

 

Volunteers in Your Agency

Discussion

How does your agency use volunteers?

Use your pre-class sheet

 

Why does your agency use volunteers? 

What are the benefits to your agency?

Small Group Discussion on Benefits

 

LARGE GROUP COLLECT

 

Make List-

23

 

What are benefits of engaging Volunteers?

Help create ambassadors and champions

 

Provide an essential link with communities

 

Enable the ability to provide a quick reaction to change or adjust to new priorities

 

Create connections for young people to our Parks and Programs

Build support for our mission

 

Provide financial and in kind resources

 

Influence decision makers

SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION- BENEFITS OF VOLUNTEERS

24

 

Benefit of Volunteers

(Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities & Congregations, Urban Institute, 2004)

We some engagement by most to some degree

25

 

Donor Engagement Study | Aligning Nonprofit Strategy with Donor Preferences

8 in 10 volunteers donate 

 

Leaders of Non-profits

Leverage Tight Resources

Maximizing Community 

Advance agency growth and development

 

“ …too few have made the connection between these goals and creating an effective system for volunteer engagement.”

Strategic Volunteer engagement: A Guide for Nonprofit and Public Sector Leaders

   

Point to List and discussion

 

Items for Key decision makers

 

Mission Critical

27

 

3 Elements for a successful Volunteer Program Grossman & Furano, Volunteer Management: Practices and Retention of Volunteers, Urban Institute

Screening- ensure appropriate entry and placement

 

Orientation & Training- skills and outlook

 

Management & Support of volunteers by paid staff to ensure volunteer time is not wasted.

 

“unless there is an infrastructure to support and direct volunteer efforts, they will remain ineffective at best, or, worse, become disenchanted and withdraw, potentially damaging recipient services”

28

 

Volunteer capacity is function of both:

 

Staff Support of volunteers

 

Adoption of Administrative Practices

Draw conclusion from previous screen

29

 

Adopt Business Sector Efficiencies

Cost

Benefits

Consequences

 

Volunteer engagement is a matter for Leaders and Policy Makers in nonprofits

Small Group: Do you agree with this as a potential model? Is it appropriate for use in evaluating Volunteer Programs?

30

 

Staff Importance

Percentage of time a paid staff member spends on volunteer management is correlated positively with:

 

Organizational capacity to take on additional volunteers

 

Adoption of volunteer management practices

 

 

(Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities & Congregations, Urban Institute, 2004)

Do you have a staff position dedicated to volunteer engagement?

 

Why/ why not?

31

 

Importance of Staff for Volunteers

3 out of 5 nonprofits have no paid coordinator

One-half devote less than 30% of their time

1 in 3 have no training

(Volunteer Management Capacity in America’s Charities & Congregations, Urban Institute, 2004)

32

 

Bottom Line….

“ ..the more energy and resources nonprofits expend on community engagement initiatives, the greater their return on the investment.”

 

Strategic Volunteer Engagement: A Guide for Nonprofit and Public Sector Leaders

1. Leads us to an Intentional Approach to engaging volunteers

33

 

Internal Assessment

How and where do volunteers fit into our mission?

 

How does vision for volunteer engagement fit with strategic goals?

 

EXERCISE:  

What strategic goal does your volunteer activity fit into?

How does it help achieve mission?

Intentional Begins with

 

 

Volunteers in administrative tasks/ direct service tasks

 

 

WHY IS IT IMPORTANT TO HAVE TOP LEVEL SUPPORT?

 

34

 

Informed Top Level Support

Maximize Volunteer participation

 

Successfully engage diverse volunteer community interests and resources

 

Create productive staff and volunteer relationships

 

Understand and control volunteer related liability

 

Connect volunteers with strategic goals

Story- YCC

35

 

EXERCISE

Consider Your Volunteer Position

What are the benefits to your organizations for this position?

Is there organizational support for engaging volunteers in this  position?

Will your agency allocate resources to engage this position?

Who will coordinate the volunteers effort?

36

 

MODULE 2

Volunteer Types, Myths and Motivation

37

 

Types of Volunteers

Regular  ‘Scheduled” Volunteers

 

Those who carry out activities at least once a month in a 12 month period

Episodic Volunteers

 

Less frequent basis, ranging from every couple of months to one-time events.

38

 

Types of Episodic

Temporary - one-time service

 

Occasional – volunteer for one activity, event,project but at regular intervals

 

Interim- serve on a regular basis but only for a short period of less than 6 months

 

Project - volunteer fairly regularly, but for a specific focus or activity only.

EXAMPLES:

Temp: Bank of America

Occasional- Fundraiser, annual cleanup day

Interim- Intern, special project

Project – generated by needs of the project- website

 

JILL FRIEDMAN VOLUNTEER ROLES Handout

39

 

Nature of Engagement

Unpaid Staff

Schedule

Keys

Uniform

Access to equipment

Independent

DIRECT IMPACT on operations

Supplemental to the staff

Coordinated service

Short-term

Support mission/ staff

Supervised

40

 

Ways to Thinking About Volunteers

TASK

Direct Service- 

    face to face with client

External Administrative ex. Fundraising

Internal Administrative 

     ex. filing/ office work

Indirect Service 

     support to main purpose 

     ex. Tree planting

 

Discuss Slide

 

Scope of Use Reported:

40%Few volunteers, few Hours

30%many volunteers, many hours

20%many volunteers, few hours

10%few volunteers, many hours

 

 

REVISIT IS THIS A VOLUNTEER

 

 

41

 

Strategic Volunteer Engagement

Associate  with cause or mission or with group

 

Who is greater than what

Connection with type of work.

 

Skills they bring

Strategic Engagement of Volunteers

 

Affiliation

 

Skill

 

HAND OUT:  EXAMPLES

42

 

EXERCISE

Consider your volunteer position: How would you classify the activity you have selected?

43

 

Volunteers are “free labor”.

 

You Can’t Spend money on free labor!

 

Volunteer Motivation is purely philanthropic.

 

You can’t say “No” to, or “fire” a volunteer.

 

Meeting Volunteer needs distracts from our mission.

 

 

 

 

1,  Volunteers are Free

a.  Agree or Disagree?

b.  Any Organization initiative: 

1.  Strategic Vision

2.  Time, Attention, Infrastructure

 

c.  Vision/Plan- Resources for task at hand – Point Person

 

You Can’t Spend Money on free labor!

a.  Funders and Board may balk

     b.  How to define ROI

1. willing to wrestle with ROI for services

2. Few question spending money to raise money, spend money to raise people

3.  Links back to earlier discussion- seeing activities linked to core activities of NPO

 

 

Motivation is purely Philanthropic.

DISCUSSION:  WHY DO VOLUNTEERS VOLUNTEER FOR YOU

 

a.  Volunteers only need to see the task completed- satisfaction comes from helping out.

 

WHY IS THIS A MYTH

 

b.  Why are volunteers exception- we don’t treat any other relationships in this way: Funders, Staff, Clients

 

 

1. Skills

2.  Career

3.  Personal

4.  Socialize

5.  Impact

 

You Can’t say no or fire a volunteer

HAS ANYONE FIRED A VOLUNTEER?

HAS ANYONE RUN INTO- we can’t say NO

Anyone had someone they need to retire?

 

WHAT DO YOU THINK?

 

Meeting volunteer Needs distracts from our mission.

Who is your client? What role do Volunteers play? Are your clients also volunteers?  Is developing community a part of the misson? What role does education and awareness play in your mission?

 

 

 

 

44

 

If we ever short of help, we can just go get some volunteers to help.

 

We can save money by using volunteers instead of staff.

 

Volunteers can’t be trusted with important stuff.

 

Volunteer Program is the Volunteer Coordinator’s or “some units” responsibility.

 

Short of Help- just go get some volunteers to help – Process and best practice to ensure volunteers meeting needs:

 

3 Legged TABLE

 

7. Save money by replacing staff with volunteers

Ethics

Non-displacement – against the law

 

8. Can’t be trusted with the important stuff

a.  Separate/ lesser value

b. What can volunteers do vs. what needs to be done

No task volunteers can’t do- open to it

prepared, trained, authorized

 

c. limits ability to leverage resources

d. VOLUNTEER is a pay scale

 

ALL WALKS OF LIFE- be opened minded

 

Volunteer Coordinator or Unit responsibility

a.  Everyone’s

b. Top management/ policy maker/ staff/ other volunteers

 

 

 

 

 

45

 

Retention means keeping our volunteers happy at all costs- if they are not happy, we did something wrong

 

If we get good enough at recruitment and retention, we’ll have volunteers who will stay with over the long haul.

 

46

 

Wrong Question:  

What can volunteers do to help us?

Right Question:  

What needs to be done around here?

47

 

Boiled down to:  

What work needs to be done around here?

How do we do it right?

 

NO task volunteers can not do if leadership is open to it.

48

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. What are the problems and challenges that your organization is currently experiencing? 

 

 

 

2. What is your nonprofit currently doing that you would like to increase, replicate, or expand? 

 

 

 

3. What is an area of your division/department that is always underutilized or understaffed or seems constantly overloaded? 

 

 

 

4. What specific skills and resources would your organization’s personnel need to fulfill your dreams? To meet its challenges? 

 

Needs Assessment

49

 

Summarize- Creating a Reality

Vision guides development of a plan for volunteer engagement

 

Clear volunteer targets integrated within strategic plans

 

Qualified person to implement the plan

 

Allocation of resources to support the plan

 

    The more energy and resources= greater the ROI

Point to Points of Light Yellow Sheet: Changing the Paradigm

 

Volunteer engagement is a resource and a strategy to achieve mission objectives and should be engaged by key decision makers.

50

 

Volunteer Motivations

51

 

Why Volunteer?

Why do people Volunteer?

Psychosocial view that human action is motive driven

Motivational forces that compel us to SEEK and ENGAGE in volunteer activities

 

52

 

Generational Differences

Greg Hammill, Mixing and Managing Four Generations of Employees, FDU Magazine Online, Winter/Spring 2005, http://www.fdu.edu/newspubs/magazine/05ws/generations.htm 

Much Work has been done.

Scott Martin and the Temple University Center for Intergenerational Learning

Zemke, Ron; Raines, Claire; Filipczak, Bob. Generations at Work: Managing the Clash of Veterans, Boomers, Xers, and Nexters in Your Workplace. New York, N.Y.: American Management Association, 2000.

 

53

 

Core Values

Hard work

Conformity

Honor

Respect for authority

Patience

Duty before pleasure

Adherence to rules

 

1922-1945

Generational Characteristics

Veterans

D. Scott Martin, Temple University Center for Intergenerational Learning

54

 

Core Values

Optimism

Team orientation

Personal gratification

Health & wellness

Personal growth

1946-1964

Generational Characteristics

Youth

Work

Involvement

Baby Boomers

D. Scott Martin, Temple University Center for Intergenerational Learning

55

 

       Core       Values

Diversity

Thinking globally

Balance

Techno literacy

1965-1980

Generational Characteristics

Fun

Informal

Self-reliance

Pragmatism

 

Generation X

D. Scott Martin, Temple University Center for Intergenerational Learning

56

 

Core Values

Optimism

Civic duty

Confidence

Achievement

Sociability

Morality

Street smarts

Diversity

1982-2001

Generational Characteristics

Millennials

D. Scott Martin, Temple University Center for Intergenerational Learning

57

 

How might these characteristic affect our interactions:

Staff with Volunteers

Volunteer engagement

Volunteer expectations

Funders

 

EXERCISE:  SMALL GROUP- 

58

 

Content Theories

Factors that produce motivation to do a particular task

Two Groups

Intrinsic- internal need or desire: ie: challenge

Extrinsic- external forces ie: money

Process Theories

Take need or motivation and translate it into action.

Not concerned with particular needs, rather means through which any need can galvanize action

 

Distribute these and ask small groups to visiulaize how these might be implemented in a volunteer context

59

 

Content Theories

Maslow Hierarchy of Needs

Herzberg Two-factor Theory

McGregor Theory X and Theory Y

McClelland Needs for Achievement, Power and Affiliation

Adams Need for Equity

60

 

Maslow Hierarchy of Needs

People are motivated by 5 basic needs:

Physiological

Safety

Social

Self-esteem

Self-Actualization

The first 2-  met outside of volunteering

Appeal by offering assignments that reflect needs

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

61

 

Herzberg Two-factor Theory

Dissatisfaction and Satisfaction are independent dimensions

Both needed to motivate

Hygiene- dissatisfaction

Motivator- satisfaction

 

Hygiene- must be met though not motivating

Once met, attend to achievement, recognition and work

 

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

Create conflict- what needs to be done- how you can help

62

 

McGregor Theory X and Theory Y

Beliefs and stereotypes affect level and quality of effort

Self-fulfilling prophecy

Live up to- or down to expectations

Summary of Theory

Volunteer application

Set a standard- pulling saplings

63

 

McClelland Needs for Achievement, Power and Affiliation

People have a predominate need for these that can be used to motivate

Knowing the driving need of volunteer

Provide assignments that allow for these motivators

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

64

 

Adams Need for Equity

Seek balance in contributions to organization and rewards they receive from the organization

Judge equity/ inequity and redress it accordingly

Volunteers feel appreciated and rewarded, especially in relation to other volunteers.

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

65

 

Process Theories

Expectancy Theory

Operant Conditioning Theory and behavior Modification Theory

Social Learning Theory

Goal Setting theory

 

66

 

Expectancy Theory

Motivation is product of expectation of capability and greater effort, and that the greater effort will yield rewards valued by the individual

Motivated to degree that they believe they can accomplish the task.

Coach or mentor to build confidence

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

67

 

Operant Conditioning Theory and Behavior Modification Theory

Reinforce positive behaviors and remove sanctions to deter negative behaviors

Use rewards for desirable behavior 

Remove rewards to reduce undesirable

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

Volunteer All Star, use of technology, Lead Volunteer, instructor etc.

68

 

Social Learning Theory

Acceptable and unacceptable behaviors are learned from the prevalent culture and activities

Establish a welcoming volunteer culture that sets high expectations for volunteers

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

69

 

Goal Setting Theory

Set Specific, difficult, and realistic goals

Generate commitment to the goals

Provide feedback on goal achievement

Set these types of goals

Series of smaller intermediate goals leading towards grand goal

Vague, unclear goals not motivating

Summary of Theory

Volunteer Application

70

 

Bad News- no quick tricks

“Result of knowing your volunteers and ensuring their needs are met.  More about creativity and attention that book or classroom learning.”

71

 

Four Factor Model (Batson, Ahmad,& Tsang 2002)

Egoism: improving ones personal well-being

 

Altruism: improving the well-being of another

 

Collectivism: improving the well-being of a group

 

Principalism: supporting essential beliefs 

72

 

Findings- Volunteers Speak Out (Ostwald & Runge)

The match between motivational goals and fulfillment influences perceptions of role as a volunteer.

 

Positive experiences = higher levels of successful volunteer outcomes AND lasting commitments

 

Relevance of benefits received to motivational needs= service satisfaction AND endurance

73

 

Findings - continued

Focus on impact of EXTERNAL incentives added element of reinforcement to intrinsic motivation.

 

Individuals are driven to volunteer not for a single- but a multitude of reasons.

74

 

Findings from Florida (Flynn & Feldheim)

4 Organizational Strategies

Mission related roles

Training

Recognition

Position Descriptions

75

 

Florida Summary

What Volunteers Want:

Make a real difference

Learn a new skill

Making community contacts

Gaining new experiences

EXERCISE

76

 

EXERCISE

Review your volunteer position: What are the possible motivators for someone to select this activity?

77

 

How to get to Motivators

Task or Performance

Body Language

Interview questions

Conversation

Staff/ Other Volunteers

Evaluation

Observation

Ask

Apparent

Application

Agency

Location

What message are these geared towards

78

 

Partner Exercise

Why do you think Volunteers choose your agency?

 

What might they be nervous/ uncertain about?

79

 

Module 3:  Models of Engagement

ACID PIT

80

 

Reason they discontinue- UPS 1998

Conflicts with more pressing demands65%

Not well managed26%

Did not use my time well      18%

Did not use volunteer talents well16%

Volunteers were not thanked 9%

 

“Poor volunteer management practices result in more lost volunteers than people losing interest…

 

“When people really want to do something, they make time”

 

81

 

(AARP- POL Conference, 2003 Staff-Volunteer Partnership)

82

 

 

 Best Practices in Leadership of Volunteers 

 

Regular supervision and communication with volunteers

 

2.  Screening procedures to identify suitable volunteers 

 

3.  Written policies and job descriptions for volunteer involvement 

 

4.  Training and professional development opportunities for volunteers 

 

5.  Training for paid staff working with volunteers 

 

6.  Recognition activities for volunteers 

 

7.  Liability coverage or insurance protection for volunteers 

 

8.  Regular collection of information on volunteer numbers and hours 

 

9.  Annual measurement of the impact of volunteers 

 

From: Volunteer Management Practices and Retention of Volunteers The Urban Institute, June 2004 

http://www.volunteerimpactfund.org/volunteer/management_brief.pdf 

Volunteer Program Statistical Analysis- McCurley and Vineyard

Jill Friedman Fixler

 

Changing the Paradigm- POL

83

 

10 Steps of Screening Volunteer Canada http://volunteer.ca/content/2012-screening-handbook

1. Assessment

2. Position Assignment

3. Recruitment

4. Application

5. Interview

6. References

7. Police Checks

8. Orientation and Training

9. Support and Supervision

10. Follow-up and Feedback

84

 

Six Seismic Shifts Jonathan McKee and Thomas W McKee, New Breed; Understanding & Equipping the 21st Century Volunteer

1. Family Dynamics: 

    From  Father Knows best to Gilmore Girls

 

2. Isolation: 

    From Community to Individualism

 

3. Flexibility: 

    From Rigid Scheduling to Volunteer     

    Availability

 

 

 

Family Dynamics: 1980’s adapted- but now single mom has less time- dramatic effect on how we have to recruit volunteers

 

Community to Individual:: 2004 average american had just 2 close friends, compared to 3 in 1985.

200 Robert Putnam: Bowling Alone- The collapse and revival of the American Community.

Conumdrum- youth “want to hang out” yet the pull in and tune out.

Sept 11 and Katrina

20 years ago volunteers copuld be found through local networks of religious and civic associations- today- reach outside this construct

 

3. Flexibility:  Example- Adopt – A Trail or Trail Traveler

85

 

Six Seismic Shifts Jonathan McKee and Thomas W McKee, New Breed; Understanding & Equipping the 21st Century Volunteer

4. Generations: 

    From  Experienced Veterans to Gen Y

 

5. Technology: 

    From Face-to-Face to Cyberspace

 

6. Professionalism: 

    From Skilled Workers to Knowledge     

    Workers

6. Professionalism: Knowledge worker is someone who wants to make decisions. They want to influence HOW the volunteer project should be completed

86

 

Volunteer Management

 

Model of work

Recruitment

Supervision

Retention

Placement

Performance Review

Managing

 

 

Partner Engagement

 

Model of leisure

Cultivating relationships

            Support

Sustainability

Consulting

            Performance  measurement

Leadership

 

Paradigm Shifts- Rick Lynch Paradigm Shift and Jill Friedman Fixler, Boomer Volunteer engagement: Collaborate Today, Thrive Tomorrow

87

 

VOLUNTEER PROCESS

Identify Need

Develop Specific Jobs (Position Descriptions)

Recruitment

Enrollment

Assignment

Supervision (follow-up)

88

 

VOLUNTEER PROCESS Step 2: POSITION DESCRIPTION Consider These….

Who will supervise the work?

What will the volunteer be responsible for?

What skills or experiences are needed for this job?

What training is required for this job?

What is the time commitment needed from the volunteer?

How will the volunteer know when he or she is successful?

What physical abilities are required for this job?

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VOLUNTEER PROCESS: Recruitment

NO SURPRISES

We want you if we are right for each other

Clearly Specify what is required

Acceptance is NOT automatic

90

 

Pyramid of Engagement

91

Leader Volunteer

Regular Volunteer

Sporadic Volunteer

Prospect

Acquaintance

91

 

Seven Deadly Sin of Recruiting Volunteers Jonathan McKee and Thomas W McKee, New Breed; Understanding & Equipping the 21st Century Volunteer

Sin 1:Expect Announcements to get volunteers

Sin 2:  Go It Alone

Sin 3:  Recruit only volunteers who make long-    

          term commitments

Sin 4:  Assume that “No” means “Never”

Sin 5:  Recruit any ‘ol B.I.C.

Sin 6:  Ask Busy people to do busy work

Sin 7:  Hire a Professional who knows nothing

          about volunteer management

Announcements: problem with word: expect- it could work, but form of marketing- great for telling about how we are meeting mission, but not effective with volunteers

 

Build an effective network: People with 1. Passion 2. Already active with you 3. Clear communicator 4. Visionary

 

Short term- introduction to you. Fits well with certain generational styles- younger volunteer- not as frightening

 

BIC- Butt in Chair- What Drives our recruitment needs? Is it NUMBER of volunteers or RIGHT person 

 

BUSY: not just to do busy work.  Necessary from time to time. New volunteer is sophiticated- wants to use their skills.

 

Volunteer Management: Good at what the organization does rather than a volunteer manager.  After school program with 50 volunteer teachers- teacher or  someone who knows how to successfully work with volunteers.

 

 

 

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Put Another Way- Seven Skills

Ask personally rather than announcements.

Develop strategic recruiting networks.

Recruit short-term project teams.

Assume that “no” means “not now” or “not for this position”.

Don’t fill any position till you find the person who matches what you’re looking for.

Recruit specific people for specific roles.

Hire true volunteer managers.

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Message

Opening should entice

Body- appealing, seek more info

Body- psychologically match how people will think:

Need- What is the reason this job should be done

Solution: How this job can help solve it.

Fears/Questions: Will I be capable?

Benefits: What’s in it for me?

Contact Point: How do I get involved?

How Will message be delivered and by whom?

 

New Breed- Consider this like Dating.

 

Whole Lecture on Relationship and treating it with standard elements in a relationship.

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95

 

96

 

97

 

Where They Found Them?

98

Pro Bono Readiness Research, 2012

98

 

Broadcasting and Cultivating 

99

Broadcasting

Cultivating

One time ask

Repeated contacts

Impersonal

Personal

Aimed at strangers

Aimed at acquaintances

Emphasizes old media

Emphasizes new media

99

99

 

Never assume everyone knows- constantly present the message

 

100

 

VOLUNTEER PROCESS Step 4: ENROLLMENT

Application

Interview

References

Police Checks

 

 

LARGE GROUP : HOW ARE YOU COLLECTING VOLUNTEER INFORMATION?

What do these convey to candidates?

What form?

What media?

What is required?

 

Ex: Friends groups- agreement.

Self Directed Team.

Trail Steward or Weed Warrior.

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Reference/ Background Checks

Establish Policy- Levels of Competency

After the interview

Permission Forms

Job related

Criminal History/ Background Checks

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VOLUNTEER PROCESS Step 5: Supervision

Orientation & Training

Support & Supervision

Follow-up & Feedback

Could Start with GAME- Vol leaves room- hide item, no clues try to find. Leave again- give clues Hot/ cold.  How did it feel.

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Orientation

3  Types of Orientation

 

1.  Cause Orientation

Why should I give my time here?

 

2.  System Orientation

How does it work here?

 

3.  Social Orientation

How will I fit into this group?

Cause- focuses on the problem the agency was created to solve. Gives opportunity for buy-in.  ED or Another Volunteer- Why THEY are their.

 

Program’s management system and workings.  Policies/ Procedures, facility tour, org chart, signin/out etc.

 

Welcome to volunteer community of the agency as a whole.  ED welcome, reception, etc.

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Training

3 Instructional Areas

Specific Abilities to SUCCEED

 

1. Knowledge – easiest- info sharing 

2. Skills – more difficult- takes time and practice

3. Attitudes- most difficult

SMALL GROUP DISCUSSION- What would these look like for your Volunteer?

 

Knowledge: Ask Group examples of knowledge for their vols: what a code blue is, how HIV is transmitted, etc.

 

SKILLS: listening skills

 

3. ATTITUDES: customer service, compassion

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Leading Volunteers- P.O.I.S.E.

Plan

Orient

Instruct

Supervise

End

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4 Tasks of a Volunteer Supervisor Betty Stallings

1.  Preparation/ Orientation of the Volunteer

2.  Ongoing Support and Resources

3.  Reporting Requirements

4.  Evaluation

Prep: Job description gone over, site ready, introduction, supervision/ eval system explained

Risk management handled

Policies/ Procedures

 

ONGOING SUPPORT: a. TrainingB. CoachingC. Ongoing informal appreciationD. Material/info to support vol

 

REPORTING: A. Volunteer HoursB. ImpactC. Vol ManagerD. Volunteer review

 

Evaluation:  A.  Annual performance reviewB. Evaluation of volunteer work

 

 

INTRO:

 

Do any of you have volunteers who work to a schedule? They come in , receive instructions and work under supervision of a staff member?

 

How about the other end- Anyone have autonomous Volunteers who decide what needs to be done, and does it.

 

Anyone in the middle- maybe- they decide but get approval- 

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Supervision

Four Levels of Supervisory Control

 

1.  Volunteer decides what to do and does it

 

2.  Volunteer decides what needs to be done, but submits  

    progress report

 

3.  Volunteer decides what needs to be done, but gets  

    approval, reports progress

 

4.  Volunteer does what he/she is told, frequently reports   

    progress

Ask for examples:

1.  Self Directed team.  Habitat construction lead

2.  Committee Sub chair fundraising, Youth Class leader

3.  Soup kitchen cook, Nature Center Aide

4.  Group project

 

Increase in level of involvement, type of volunteer, risk  closer to 1.

Increase time and demands closer to 4

 

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Benefits of Recognition

Increased motivation

Building spirit with organization

Increased awareness of your agency, mission and volunteer opportunities

Retention

Accomplishment of mission

Do any of you have volunteer recognition for your volunteers?

 

Small Group Conversation.

Group Collect- ones that stood out.

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Levels of Recognition

Individual – 

Thank You, Rewards or perks, acknowledgment, Feedback

 

Community

Individual or collective efforts

Local, state national award, News stories, webpage, social media

Recognition event

 

Organization- Recognize individual and collect 

Newsletter, party/ picnic, Awards, Formal event

 

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Key Concepts of Recognition ( Betty Stallings, Building Better Skills)

Is an on-going integral part of the management process

Can be formal or informal

Meaningful to the recipient, not the person presenting

Can be creative and fun

Should be sincere, not just hours but impact

Should be timely

 

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Module 3: Other Things Considered

Evaluation

 

Risk Management

 

Fundraising Volunteers

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Evaluation- Changing Paradigm

 

Old Structure

Accountability by monitoring service delivery

 

Reporting on program operations

 

Funding tied to what got done

 

Standardized models/ risk-taking discouraged

New Format

Accountability by monitoring results

 

Reporting on results attained

 

Funding tied to results attained

Diverse models/ risk-taking encouraged

 

VALUE/ Work Performed            IMPACT/ Results

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Common Mistakes Defining Result Rick Lynch 2005

Mistaking Quantities of Activities for Results

Mistaking Quality of Activity for Results

Mistaking Good Intentions with Results

Mistaking a Particular Method with Results

Mistaking Spending with Results

Mistaking Cost with Results

Mistaking Internal Circumstances with Results

Quantity: volume of effort with outcome  “ Increase number of volunteer hours contributed to tutoring program”- increase in volume not desire for outcome

 

Quality: addiiton of qualitative modfiers: Students will be taught in a professional manner

 

Good Intentions: Outcomes are about effect, not motives. Teachers will take graduate level courses” assumption that it will improve student learning, not about the coursed outcomes or impact on the teachers.

 

Converting to a practice or equipment or system is not a result.

 

Spending: Increase spending per client by 5% does not say what will be accomplished

 

COSTS: Same…while it may be good for the budget does it equate to better service outcome.

 

CIRCUMSTANCES: Improve moral or get everyone certified, may help succeed, but not results in themselves.

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EXERCISE

Consider your Volunteer Position:

What elements of Orientation are required

What elements of training are required for success?

How would you evaluate the activity towards mission achievement?

How would you recognize the volunteer’s efforts?

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Risk Management

Not so much about “not getting sued” as it is keeping everyone safe

Examination of Risks- Task Analysis

Will NOT prevent you from being sued, it may prevent you from losing

Duty to care and Demonstrate Due Care

RICK LYNCH WORKSHEET

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Volunteer Liability

(b) No volunteer of an organization shall be subject to suit directly, derivatively or by way of contribution for any civil damages under the laws of Delaware resulting from any negligent act or omission performed during or in connection with an activity of such organization.

 

Chapter 10 Delaware Code section 8133 provides very clear limits on the liability of volunteers:

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Exceptions….

if injury is caused by the volunteer as a result of driving a vehicle, than the  damages recovered “shall not exceed the limits of applicable insurance coverage maintained”. 

 

It also allows that the immunity granted in subsection (b)” shall not extend to any act or omission constituting willful and wanton or grossly negligent conduct.

118

 

Volunteer Protection Act 1997

volunteer was acting within scope of their responsibilities (job description)

volunteer had appropriate certification or authorization to perform work

harm not caused by willful misconduct, gross negligence, flagrant disregard for rights and safety

harm wasn’t caused by operation of a vehicle state required special license to  operate

119

 

VOLUNTEER PROCESS

Identify Need

Develop Specific Jobs (Position Descriptions)

Recruitment

Enrollment

Assignment

Supervision (follow-up)

120

 

George Levinger: Relationship Model

Acquaintance

Buildup 

Continuation

Deterioration

Termination

 

121

 

122

 

Volunteer Frustrations

May feel more qualified than staff

 

I’m here to help- staff should be grateful

 

We do the same but staff get paid

 

Told what to do, but not asked for input

 

I get the work no one else wants to do

 

No work prepared for me

 

Feel unappreciated and out of the loop

WORST VOLUNTEER STORIES YOU HAVE

123

 

Staff Frustrations

Fears About job Security

 

Increased work load= burden

 

Fear of managing volunteers/ controlling volunteers

 

Apprehension about diminished quality of service

 

Reservations about dependability 

 

Limited workspace

BEST VOLUNTEER STORIES

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System to Resolve Staff Resistance

Policy on Volunteer Involvement

Assess Staff Capabilities

Staff Orientation to the Volunteer program

Volunteer Position Creation

Volunteer Placement & Monitoring

Staff Responsibility

Feedback & Recognition of Staff

Relationship Building

 

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Six Keys to Building Rapport http://positivelymagazine.com/

Listen

Make him/her feel comfortable

Identify a connection

Stay Connected

Keep it Honest

Accept differences

 

126

 

Betty Stallings and Donna McMillon, 1999, Building Better Skills

127

 

6 Building Steps

Clear & Expand Job Opportunities

Event Leader

Steering Committee

Orientation & Training

Management of Event Volunteers

Recognition

128

 

1. Clear Opportunities- Know what you need

Maximize Talent, Expertise and willingness

All ways Volunteers CAN be used

Day Of

Prior To

Multiple Volunteers

Position Descriptions

Ambassadors

129

 

2. Leadership- Picking the GC

Most Important- get the right person

What skills

Doesn’t Look Like They Do Anything?

Know what should be happening

Gets right people to make it happen

 

 

130

 

3. Steering Committee Sub Contractors

Minimum # to Lead Key Functions

Position Description

Time

Authority

Training

Reports

Evaluation

Timeline – deadlines, responsibilities

Who Chooses

 

131

 

4. Orientation/ Training Job Assignment

Committee Chairs

Event Volunteers

To the Task

Many Ways

Part of description

What would someone need to know to feel comfortable doing this?

 

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5. Event Volunteers Management Site Foreman

Volunteer Coordinator

- Assistants

Anticipate No-Shows

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6. Recognition- Dedication

Many ways

Be creative

 

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